Diabetes Articles
  • Sign Up
FacebookTwitterDiggStumbleuponGoogle BookmarksRedditLinkedinPinterest

Depression Seems to Increase Risk of Kidney Failure: Study

THURSDAY, March 10 (HealthDay News) -- Depression appears to increase the risk of kidney failure, according to a new study.

Depression was linked to a higher rate of hospitalization for acute kidney injury (formerly known as acute kidney failure), even after adjusting for heart disease, inflammatory markers, and lifestyle factors such as body mass index (BMI), smoking, alcohol consumption and physical activity, according to the investigators.

The study (Longitudinal Association of Depressive Symptoms with Rapid Kidney Function Decline and Adverse Clinical Renal Disease Outcomes), led by Dr. Willem Kop of the Department of Medical Psychology andNeuropsychology at the University of Tilburg, the Netherlands, included 5,785 people in the United States who were followed for 10 years. At the start of the study, the participants were 65 years and older and were not on kidney dialysis.

The researchers found that depression was also associated with a higher prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) at baseline. It was 20% more common in people with chronic kidney disease than in those without the disease.

The study appears online March 10 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

"People with elevated depressive symptoms have a higher risk of subsequent adverse kidney disease outcomes. This is partially explained by other medical factors related to depression and kidney disease. But the association with depression was stronger in patients who were otherwise healthy compared to those who had co-existing medical disorders such as diabetes or heart disease," the researchers wrote in a journal news release.

The researchers are currently examining factors that may explain the link between depression and kidney disease and failure. These could include delays in seeking medical care, the effect that depression has on the immune and nervous systems, and miscommunication between patients and doctors.

Sources
http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=140683
http://www.tilburguniversity.edu/webwijs/show/?uid=w.j.kop
http://www.tilburguniversity.edu/about-tilburg-university/schools/socialsciences/departments/mpnp/
http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/
http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/content/early/2011/03/10/CJN.03840510.abstract?sid=320e08bf-501b-4b86-ae0d-db5c128f828b

Read Full Article

Find out if you qualify for discount Diabetic testing supplies, free offers or other running discounts at this time.


  1. First Name*
    Enter first name
  2. Last Name*
    Enter last name
  3. Phone*
    Enter valid US phone number
  4. E-mail*
    Enter email address



By submitting this form I authorize to be contacted by telephone. Please be assured that we value and protect your privacy. Co-Pays and Deductibles may apply.

About The Diabetes Network

The Diabetes Network was developed with the idea that people living with diabetes needed a central place to go for resources as well as get ideas, suggestions and encouragement. We have put a lot of effort into this website to make it easy and fun to navigate as well as informative so that you can have a voice when it comes to managing your diabetes. Please let us know how we can improve this website to better suit your needs.

More about our Mission

We're on a mission to make the healthcare community more technologically advanced than ever before. This website adapts to fit your tablet, iPad®, iPhone®, Android® or other smartphone. Just one of the ways we are working to make life easier for those living with Diabetes. Learn More...