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Articles about food and supplements for the diabetic.

Comment on: Kaiyala et al. (2010) Identification of Body Fat Mass as a Major Determinant of Metabolic Rate in Mice. Diabetes;59:1657-1666

  1. Paul S. MacLean
  1. From the Center for Human Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Diabetes, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, Colorado.
  1. Corresponding author: Paul S. MacLean, paul.maclean{at}ucdenver.edu.

The article by Kaiyala et al. (1) in the July issue of Diabetes represents a significant step forward for metabolic research. The emergence of regression as the gold standard for normalizing energy expenditure data in mice (2,3) will undoubtedly minimize a translational barrier between clinical and preclinical research communities. One concern when using this approach in other species has been whether fat mass should be included in the model (4,5) given that it may have a regulatory impact on metabolic rate. In most cases, the purpose for this normalization is to control for the variation in “metabolic mass,” or tissue that significantly contributes to the …

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My Favorite Shareposts and Experts from 2010

The start of a new year can be filled with hope, but sometimes the strength of our convictions comes from what we know.  In order to change patterns and to think differently, we should look to the past! 

This year has been one that opened many new opportunities for me.  It has been a year of learning more about diabetes then I ever imagined I would care to know!  The best part has been opening my arms wide and letting friends into the interesting world of diabetes and educating them.  But it also has been a two way street! 

This year fostered my reaching out to fellow type 2 experts, who are so knowledgeable on the relationship with diabetes, food, exercise that their knowledge surpasses most of my phd sports physiology friends! 

The diversity of information from this group of Amylia, Bill, David, Fran, Gretchen, John, Joan (Verdungal), Kelsey, Beth and Kerri has educated and entertained me all year!  So I have decided, on this last day of the year, to post some of my favorite expert’s shareposts by this community and some from other communities on Health Central!

Gretchen Becker’s Learning from Type1’s. I had the pleasure of attending a conference at Cleveland Clinic with Gretchen.  Her depth of knowledge and good common sense make her blogs very educational, but it is her rye wit that grabs and makes everyone think twice!

Joan (Verdungal) 34 Low Carb & Healthy Blogs for November 2010. Joan is amazing in her knowledge of food and natural living!  I think of myself as understanding the earthy crunchy soul, but she takes it to a much higher level and her research is on the mark! (She even convinced Ginger to get off artificial sweeteners!)

Amylia’s 1 in 3 Americans Diabetic in 2050?  Amylia, the writer, poet and sultry diabetes voice just lends emotional, whimsical, romance while packing her posts full of god information!

Bill’s Same Song, Second Verse. Bill is my “go to” guy when I have a medical blog request!  He is the diabetes Renaissance man, having worked for pharmaceuticals, to being a endocrinologist and living with diabetes, there are few angles he doesn’t understand!

John’s post The Last Five Pounds. John joined us at the beginning of 2010 with a new years resolution.  He has shared the ups and downs of learning how to change his life in order to take control of his health!  What a year he has shared with us!  He is but 5 pounds from his goal! Awesome!

Fran’s Daily Insulin Injection vs. Insulin Pump: Where are we now?  I don’t even know which blog to choose, as a favorite!  Fran is a pediatric diabetelogist and in her spare time writes about what most parents hanker to read!  She is a wealth of knowledge and a compassionate soul who shares because someone is out there who needs help! 

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Tied and Twisted in the Emotions of Diabetes

It’s easy to look at a person with diabetes whose blood sugars are running up around 300 mg/dL and say, “Geez, you need to just stop neglecting yourself!”

It's easy to judge, to think, "C'mon, just do it! Just take your insulin and take care of it all!"

But the real question is, “By neglecting your diabetes and purposefully hurting your body, what is that doing for you?"

It must be doing something beneficial…otherwise you wouldn’t keep doing it. Even though cigarettes are obviously harmful, people still smoke them because it feels good, it provides an obvious benefit.

Even if the benefit is small in comparison to the damage your body is suffering, purposefully neglecting your diabetes may be your method of coping with the overwhelming emotions around diabetes.

The next question is: Do you want to challenge those emotions and find your new way of living with this disease? Are you ready to work towards finding a healthy way of getting that same benefit?

From the outside, diabetes appears slightly complex but straightforward: take your insulin, check your blood sugar, count your carbohydrates, and carry on with your day.

But diabetes, like many other challenges in life, can have a way of twisting itself throughout every single part of our life and our emotions. It isn’t straightforward; it’s incredibly complex, and the immense challenge of taking care of diabetes every day can play a variety of games in our heads.

Some of those games have side effects that seem fairly harmless. I know diabetes has definitely increased my own personal desire to be in control of situations and schedules, because I’m so used to always trying to be in control of my blood sugar. Because of diabetes, I like to be in control.

I also know it places a significant emphasis on my health. To me, exercising every day isn’t just about trying to feel “fit”…it’s about trying to keep my blood vessels strong, my eyes healthy, my kidneys functioning. I exercise so I can live longer and prevent complications.

Some of those games, though, can become very self-destructive. They actually hurt us further, but it is often a method of coping, of expressing the anger of having to live with this disease we didn’t choose, or a method of saying, “I’m overwhelmed! I’m scared. I can’t do this.”

Food is another part of managing diabetes that becomes incredibly twisted in our emotions. Food is never just food when you live with diabetes. Food is the enemy. Food is the hero. Food is the hardest part of the balancing act.

It’s only normal that all of that will impact how you feel about food, think about food, and how you use food in your life.

How do you use food?

Do you ever use food to ease emotions? Distract yourself from emotions? Comfort pain? Or even to purposefully mess with your entire diabetes management program, raise your blood sugars, and hurt your body?

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5 years ago, I began the long process of QUITTING junk food!

Ginger Vieira has lived with Type 1 diabetes and Celiac for 11+ years. She holds 14 national, drug-tested powerlifting records and the Vermont State Bench Press record. Today, she is a cognitive health & chronic illness life coach at Living-in-Progress.

Five years ago, the way I ate and the way I exercised and the way I felt about my health was tremendously different. In many ways, I was a much different person. Not only did I purposefully and regularly eat gluten even though I had been diagnosed with Celiac disease, I ate a variety of things I would never voluntarily eat today. I knowingly would overeat when I was upset about something or was really stressed out. I gladly drank liquor and beer at parties during college. I ate pizza, ate Chinese food, ate candy and junk whenever I felt like it.

Don't get me wrong, underneath was the basics of good nutrition, but the overall concept of filling my body only with good, wholesome foods was not something I gave much thought to. And the transition from where I was then to where I am today was a very gradual change.

Five years ago, if you said to me, "You need to eat organic food, exercise every day, avoid all gluten, remove all fake sugars from your diet and quit drinking coffee," I would've laughed! I could never handle making that many changes at one time! Besides, I also wouldn't

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Five Years Ago, I Used to Eat Chinese Food and Plenty of Ice Cream

Ginger Vieira has lived with Type 1 diabetes and Celiac for 11+ years. She holds 14 national, drug-tested powerlifting records and the Vermont State Bench Press record. Today, she is a cognitive health & chronic illness life coach at Living-in-Progress.

Five years ago, the way I ate and the way I exercised and the way I felt about my health was tremendously different. In many ways, I was a much different person. Not only did I purposefully and regularly eat gluten even though I had been diagnosed with Celiac disease, I ate a variety of things I would never voluntarily eat today. I knowingly would overeat when I was upset about something or was really stressed out. I gladly drank liquor and beer at parties during college. I ate pizza, ate Chinese food, ate candy and junk whenever I felt like it.

Don't get me wrong, underneath was the basics of good nutrition, but the overall concept of filling my body only with good, wholesome foods was not something I gave much thought to. And the transition from where I was then to where I am today was a very gradual change.

Five years ago, if you said to me, "You need to eat organic food, exercise every day, avoid all gluten, remove all fake sugars from your diet and quit drinking coffee," I would've laughed! I could never handle making that many changes at one time! Besides, I also wouldn't have

Read more...

What Can Happen if You Don’t Control Your Blood Glucose Levels?

Just because you have been told that managing and keeping track of your blood glucose levels is very important for managing your diabetes does not necessarily mean that you understand why that is. Using exercise, diabetic recipes, diabetic diet plans, medications, and your blood glucose meter is very important, but why do you have to keep such a close eye on it, what’s the worst that can happen? The truth is, there are a great many bad things that can happen as a result of not controlling your blood glucose levels.

High blood glucose levels over an extended period of time can result in several negative things. These things are a wide range of complications, including kidney failure, eyesight loss, and severe heart problems. Infections, chronic lethargy, excessive urination, and extreme thirst or hunger are all other side effects of leaving high blood glucose levels go untreated.

Low blood glucose levels can also cause negative complications if left alone without attempt to control it for an extended period of time. These things include coma, loss of consciousness, and seizures. Irritability, sweating, hunger, dizziness, shaking, dry mouth, and weakness are also negative side effects of being hypoglycemic for long periods of time.

The bottom line is that diabetes is a disease and condition that needs to be caught early and closely monitored when it is to ensure that there are no lasting problems or complications, and that you live as long as possible without any major health problems as a result of it.

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