Diabetes Articles
  • Sign Up
FacebookTwitterDiggStumbleuponGoogle BookmarksRedditLinkedinPinterest

Glucose Sensor Technology Featured at Dr. Heile’s Pump Group

It’s a busy week with another great opportunity to find out about some newer pump technology.  On Wednesday, June 3rd at 7:30pm, Dr. Heile’s Insulin Pump Support Group will feature the Freestyle Navigator with insight into Glucose Sensor Technology.  Find out what’s happening with this latest technology to help manage blood glucose on a frequent basis. 

Join the group at The Family Medical Group Timeless Medspa on the westside of town.  It’s at 3260 Westbourne Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45248.  If you have any questions, you may contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  Unfortunately, I won’t be able to make it, but let me know if you do.  I always welcome input from others on these events.

Read Full Article

Back to School! Diabetic Tips

Back to School! Diabetic Tips July 29, 2010

Posted by amdiabetessatx in Uncategorized.
trackback

Make your child’s school an American Diabetes Association Safe at School Superstar, a school that provides exemplary care for students with diabetes.

The Checklist of ADA Safe at School practices:

  • THE SCHOOL’S NURSE and administrators coordinate with a student’s parents or guardian and doctor to create a diabetes care plan.
  • WRITTEN CARE PLANS include the Diabetes Management Plan and the Section 504 Plan, which detail everything about a child’s care at school and during school-related activities. This includes what to do in case of an emergency, which school staff members have been trained to provide care, and how much diabetes management the child may do on his or her own.
  • THE SCHOOL ALLOWS a capable child to check blood glucose in class, unless the care plan calls for giving the student assistance or granting privacy.
  • IF A CHILD with diabetes goes on a field trip, a school staff member trained in diabetes care is also present.
  • A CHILD WITH diabetes is welcomed into any after-school program or sports team, and a staff member or coach trained in diabetes care is present at that school-sponsored activity.
  • THE SCHOOL NURSE or other qualified health care professional has trained staff members on how to recognize and treat low blood glucose and administer insulin and glucagon.
  • THE SCHOOL CAFETERIA staff provides nutrition information, including carbohydrate counts, with menus.

*** Fore more info, please visit: http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/parents-and-kids/diabetes-care-at-school/safe-at-school/safe-at-school-statement-of.html

****IF YOU NEED HELP explaining your child’s right to diabetes care to school administrators, start by calling the ADA Center for Information and Community Support at 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) and by reviewing the resource at diabetes.org/safeatschool


Read Full Article

A Good Saturday for a T1 Athlete

On Saturday, Feb 26th, I ran the Castlewood Cup 15K trail race and later that afternoon I talked about running and doing triathlons at the JDRF Family Retreat here in St. Louis.  A very good day for an athlete with Type 1 Diabetes!

This was my second running of the Castlewood Cup.  It’s a fantastic race and just a ton of fun.  I don’t get a chance to do much trail running, but I wish that I did.  9.3 miles fly by on the trails!  I won’t go into much detail about the race this year.  You can read last year’s race report here, which has a lot of info on the race and the course.  I did manage to set a race PR by 9 minutes by running a 1:28:14, which was good for 135th out of 322.

In the afternoon, myself and James Murphy, another fellow Insulindependence/Triabetes member, presented at the JDRF Family Retreat.  We had an hour and 15 minutes to talk about managing blood glucose during sports and exercise.  This was my first time speaking to a group like this, I was a little nervous, but I simply love talking about this stuff, so I knew as soon as we got started I would be fine and enjoy it.

We had a group of about 30 people sit down and listen to us talk about our experiences running and doing triathlons.  James spoke first and showed a quick Triabetes video.  After that a CDE that joined us spoke for a bit and then I got up.  I started by showing an image of what my Dexcom looked like during Castlewood.  This was great, because it showed a spike right at the start of the race and another spike right after the race.  We had a lot of questions about dealing with BG spikes during exercise as opposed to going low.  A lot of kids playing sports in school are doing short bursts of speed and not doing 6 or 7 hour triathlons.

NOTE:  On my Dexcom graph, the 1st bump was breakfast, the 2nd was the start of the race, and the 3rd was at the end of the race.

After talking about Castlewood, I went into the main portion of my talk and presented how I did my basal plan for Branson 70.3.  I wrote a post about this last year, so I essentially turned this into Powerpoint and talked about it.  We had a good discussion with the group and I think everybody learned a lot and took away some good info.

I really enjoy sharing my experiences and trying to help and inspire others with Type 1 Diabetes.  It’s a humbling experience at times, but I love it.

Read Full Article

Trying out the diet…

Thursday, I started my (official) journey to a A1C that is within baby making range.

The standards my endo gave me were to be as close to 6% as possible. The blood glucose goals she gave me were:

  • Fasting: 60-95 mg/dL
  • One hour after meals: <140 mg/dL
  • Two hours after meals: <120 mg/dL
  • Bedtime: 60-99

Right now, these numbers seem more than a little intimidating to me. After eating my blood sugar soars over two hundred almost every time.

I do know that I haven’t really been watching my carb intake (I count the carbs…but then I eat A LOT of them), and my eating schedule is all over the place. I think if I can decrease the amount of carbs I take in at each meal, and try to stick to some semblance of a schedule, it could help me.

Today, I took my dog on a two hour walk, and since I stopped running in August it felt good to get out and get some exercise. When I returned from my walk, my blood sugar was 105 (down from 180 at the beginning of the walk).

Does anybody have any other tips that might help me out? I’m trying to get my numbers within the BG goals for pregnancy so that it is not a huge shock once I am pregnant.


Read Full Article

Still Diabetic

When I first went to my diabetes-education class, two years ago, there was a woman there who was coming back for a “refresher” because she’d slipped up. I was less than a week into my diagnosis, and I was like the STAR STUDENT. I was checking my blood glucose level 5 times a day, I was exercising, I was doing it all. This woman, probably about ten or fifteen years older than me, looked at me and sighed, “I used to be like you, back in the beginning.” I felt sad for her and thought, I’m never coming back to this class! I’m never going to stop doing what I need to do!

Well.

In the spirit of getting back on track, I started testing my blood sugars again this week. And I have to say, the news hasn’t been so pretty. But it’s giving me information. Like the delicious new Lemon Mousse 2-point bars from WW are really not so diabetes friendly. Over the past six months or so, my testing has slipped down. Like I said in the tracking post, it started with the “I got this!” attitude. I’d been testing and testing, and it was always the same – my numbers were good – and the little testing strips are so darn expensive – and I thought – I must have this DOWN. I know what I’m doing. I am fine. I don’t need to test so much. And soon it turned into just testing in the morning and then I went away and the testing kit was in my suitcase and I came home and somehow just never unpacked it. Um.

I have an endocrinologist appointment coming up in a few weeks and I have the sinking feeling that I’m not going to be getting a huge glowing report card and congratulatory letter about my stellar blood labs this time. But it’s good. I need to know this. I need to stay on top of these things and remember.

 

Read Full Article

Laughing to Lower Blood Glucose

That may sound funny, but there’s some truth to the matter!  Last Wednesday night, I hit the road heading to the westside of Cincinnati to the Pumpers Support Group, run by Doc Heile.  With about 30 or so in attendance, it was a fun night with guest speaker, Trisha Porretti, RN, BSN, CDE from Florida presenting “Can Laughter Lower Blood Glucose?”  Not only did she entertain with stories from her life and experiences with diabetes, hospitals  and nursing school, but she also gave us some motivational facts that indicate laughter can truly help diabetics. 

The presentation used humor to help motivate and shift perspective on how to manage and live well with diabetes.   While some of the presentation was a little clinical, Trisha brought it to reality for the audience and kept it light.  Listening to her talk, it reminded me of years back when I was first diagnosed, and I was searching for any and all information I could find about diabetes.  I learned a lot, but most of the information just brought me down about how difficult it was to control and how many complications can come from it.  Although I would still suggest to any newly diagnosed person to read everything they can, you also have to balance that with the good side.  And, that’s really the true message that Trisha delivered.

Dealing with diabetes can be frustrating, but you can’t let that part take over.  As she remined us, “Any day above ground is a good day!”  And that’s so true.  

During the meeting, she tracked how many times we laughed, and it totaled 98-plus times–which according to her research is much more than the normal adult laughs per day, usually only 17 times on average.  This she compared to children who laugh over 400 times per day on average.  That made me feel good since my laughter that night not only reduced my muscle tension, helped my vascular system, improved my immune system and helped improve my post-pranial blood glucose, but it also just made me feel great! 

Thanks, Trisha, Animas and Doc Heile for keeping us in stitches and good health!  To find out more about upcoming meetings at Doc Heile’s website.

Read Full Article

Find out if you qualify for discount Diabetic testing supplies, free offers or other running discounts at this time.


  1. First Name*
    Enter first name
  2. Last Name*
    Enter last name
  3. Phone*
    Enter valid US phone number
  4. E-mail*
    Enter email address



By submitting this form I authorize to be contacted by telephone. Please be assured that we value and protect your privacy. Co-Pays and Deductibles may apply.

About The Diabetes Network

The Diabetes Network was developed with the idea that people living with diabetes needed a central place to go for resources as well as get ideas, suggestions and encouragement. We have put a lot of effort into this website to make it easy and fun to navigate as well as informative so that you can have a voice when it comes to managing your diabetes. Please let us know how we can improve this website to better suit your needs.

More about our Mission

We're on a mission to make the healthcare community more technologically advanced than ever before. This website adapts to fit your tablet, iPad®, iPhone®, Android® or other smartphone. Just one of the ways we are working to make life easier for those living with Diabetes. Learn More...