Diabetes Articles
  • Sign Up
FacebookTwitterDiggStumbleuponGoogle BookmarksRedditLinkedinPinterest

bookDiabetes articles about daily topics that affect those living with diabetes. There is a lot of information about diabetes and hopefully you find this information useful in your everyday life. Here we have compiled a list of older articles from our previous "The Diabetes Network" along with links to blogs and articles, an extended reading archive. You can use the search in the top-right menu to search for specific articles.

 

School Supplies.

We, at my pump gear, strive to bring quality insulin pump accessories to kids & kids at heart. Our blog has several purposes:

1. To share information surrounding our #1 hope: a cure!
2. To share current & relevant information about insulin pumps and how to manage life with one.
3. To share anything having to do with diabetes awareness.
4. To share in the support system that is the diabetes online community, with empathy, compassion and humor!

Check out our website!

www.mypumpgear.com

Read Full Article

Islet update

I seem to be in a stable place right now.  I'm still taking about 8 units of insulin per day.  The best strategy seems to be to take 6 units of Lantus at supper time and 1 unit of Novolog before breakfast and before lunch.  With the change in the seasons, I have been getting my exercise in after supper instead of immediately before.  I miss my walk, but this way, I can skip my before supper unit of Novolog.

This seems to keep me steady.  I get a few highs and even some lows.  Both seem to be direct effects of exercise or lack thereof.  I can tell when my body is stressed as well.  I had a headache last week that caused an increase.  Emotions have the same effect.  Its surprising how quickly things can get out of range.  I really have to keep my hands on the reins.

I saw my opthomologist last week.  Still no signs of any retinopathy.
I have been lucky with staying healthy too.  I've been around some coughing and sneezing and worse people without catching anything.

I have been sleeping much better lately.  My insomnia stopped abruptly about the time that I started taking insulin.  I rarely have to get up and read anymore to get myself back to sleep.


On the research front, a new treatment that invovles taking stem cells from testicular cells and converting them into insulin producing cells has been making the news. It may be that we have the power to heal ourselves. It sounds very encouraging and it is also noted that for females, the oocyte should be able to accomplish the same thing.

Also, Living Cell Technologies has just been granted the right to administer its Diabecell product in Russia.  This is the encapsulated pig islet cells.  The procedure costs $150,000 now, but should decrease as more people opt to try this.  This is important because it will increase the number of people who can try it and therefore increase our knowledge about the treatment in general.

Other good news is that the Special Diabetes Program has passed in both the House and the Senate.  This is good news because it is a pledge of $150 million dollars for two years.  This provides funding for many cure based research projects.  I'm hoping it will open the door for many more clinical trials.


These are my kids on the Pacific Ocean.  Becky's birthday present was plane tickets to go see Gary and Cassie in CA.

Below is an islet/stem cell that I thought was just beautiful.

 

Read Full Article

To carb or not to carb?

The challenge question:

Thursday 5/13 - To carb or not to carb. Today let’s blog about what we eat. And perhaps what we don’t eat. Some believe a low carb diet is important in diabetes management, while others believe carbs are fine as long as they are counted and bolused for. Which side of the fence do you fall on? What kind of things do you eat for meals and snacks? What foods do you deem bolus-worthy? What other foodie wisdom would you like to share?

I suppose I fall in the middle. Carbohydrates are certainly something to be limited if you wish to reduce the amount of insulin you inject. I've followed the low-carb way of eating off and on and I do have a lot of energy when I am eating low carb. It's expensive, though, and I usually end up freaking out and eating carbs after a week or so. More often, I just eat what I want and bolus to cover it. Life is too short.

That being said, I do have some simple rules:

(1) I can eat what I want, as long as I record it in my food diary and make the effort to look up the carbs.

(2) If I am going to drink soda (and I have a love/hate relationship with it for various reasons), it has to be diet.

(3) Whenever possible, eat food and not foodstuff. You know the difference. If it comes in a box, sits on a shelf or contains any ingredients you can't realistically find in your kitchen, it ain't food.


The final foodie wisdom I will share with you non-existent readers (yes, I'm talking about... you!), is to read and listen to author Michael Pollan. He does an excellent job of explaining food and agricultural issues and is practical (and realistic). I've read almost all of his books and would highly recommend them.

Because of him, we (a) have belonged to a CSA - community sustained agriculture - in which we support a local farmer and her family by buying all of our needed produce and eggs (fertilized AND really cage free!) from her; (b) haven't purchased bread in over two years because we make all of it ourselves in a whopping 5 minutes or so of work per day; and (c) make such "oddities" as our own, homemade corned beef, soups, etc.

Read Full Article

BIG BLUE, PART 2

I'm well aware that I have never been without any medical supplies.
Growing up my dad had amazing health insurance coverage and we had closets (yes, plural) filled with supplies.
Now grown up and on my own insurance,
I am again, blessed with everything I need.

* All it took was a phone call from my doctor to get set up with sensors and my continuous glucose monitor.
* My pump just ran out of warranty in August.
* One phone call and I was upgraded to the newest model.
* I even got to choose the color I wanted (pink!), and it was sent to my work just days later.
* My insurance was so good in fact, that after turning in my old pump, I had a credit of money on my account...so essentially, I got paid to go on an upgraded pump.

Not everyone is as fortunate
and some even lack a basic needle and vial of insulin they need to keep them alive!!!

BUT...many people and various organizations have come together to make it possible for children with Diabetes in some of the poorest countries to receive the insulin they need.

And to make it happen, all you need to do is watch this video:

Up until November 14th (World Diabetes Day), money will be donated to this cause.
Read the press release here to find out more info:
Thanks for doing your part.

GO BIG BLUE!!!!   :)

Read Full Article

Study uncovers new diabetes genes

27 June 2010 (BBC)

Twelve new genes linked with type 2 diabetes have been found in a study into the differences in people's DNA and their risk of having the condition.

A consortium including Edinburgh University scientists have identified "important clues to the biological basis of type 2 diabetes". It is hoped the findings will lead to better ways of treating the condition.

The genes tend to be involved in working cells producing insulin, which controls levels of glucose in blood. The 12 new genes brings the total number linked with type 2 diabetes to 38.

The study was led by researchers at Oxford University and forms part of the Wellcome Trust case control consortium. The group of researchers, from across the UK, Europe, USA and Canada, compared the DNA of more than 8,000 people with type 2 diabetes with almost 40,000 people without the condition. They then checked the genetic variations they found in another group including over 34,000 people with diabetes and almost 60,000 controls.

Dr. Jim Wilson, of Edinburgh University, said: "One very interesting finding is that the diabetes susceptibility genes also contain variants that increase the risk of unrelated diseases, including skin and prostate cancer, coronary heart disease and high cholesterol. "This implies that different regulation of these genes can lead to many different diseases."

Professor Mark McCarthy of Oxford University's Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism, said: "Gradually we are piecing together clues about why some people get diabetes and others don't, with the potential for developing better treatments and preventing onset of diabetes in the future. "The challenge will be to turn these genetic findings into better ways of treating and preventing the condition."

Sources include:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/scotland/edinburgh_east_and_fife/10416128.stm
http://www.scotlandsfamily.com/dna-testing.htm
http://www.ocdem.ox.ac.uk/home
http://www.ndm.ox.ac.uk/principal-investigators/researcher/mark-mccarthy
http://www.diabetes.org.uk
http://www.wtccc.org.uk

Read Full Article

6 things - D blog day

Here are six things I wish people knew about living with Type 1 diabetes:

1. It's complicated.
To some people it seems like if I just watch what I eat, give insulin, and prick my fingers I will be right as rain. It's not that easy. Diabetes is complicated. It's a hundred decisions about "simple things" like eating and exercising. It's constantly thinking about what's next, what's worked, what hasn't worked, and what's ahead. What works one day doesn't always work the next. It's like a lifelong brain-teaser.

2. It's a lot of mind games.
It's a lot of mind work. It's constant mental math trying to calculate carbs and insulin. (and I HATE math. I'm rotten at it) Trying to remember how food affected me in the past. Trying to remember to keep a running total of carbs that I eat. Remembering to bolus for said carbs. Convincing myself that a high or low number on my tester doesn't mean failure and doesn't mean I have to beat myself up. Convincing my mind that I can do this. My brain can be simply exhausted some days to tackle all that I need to tackle just to stay healthy.

3. It's a time stealer.
Diabetes takes time. Time to remember supplies. Time to fill cartridges with insulin. Time to deal with insurance companies. Time to test. Time to change my pump site. Time to read labels. Time to figure out solutions to blood sugar problems. Time lost to lows. Time lost to highs. Time to keep supplies stocked. Time for doctor appointments.
I've said that if I was cured, I'd have a heck of a lot of free time.

4. It's damaging.
Diabetes damages small blood vessels. In my eyes, in my gastrointestinal system, in my kidneys, and in my fingers and toes. Controlling my blood sugars helps stop some of the damage. But having diabetes means that damage is taking place under my skin. It's scary to think about. It's hard to not worry about what might happen.

5. If you know a person with diabetes, you know ONE person with diabetes.
This disease isn't the same for all of us. What works for one person, doesn't work for another. The way one person uses insulin isn't the way another person does. What diet strategy works well for one of us, doesn't work for another. It is called diabetes, but it looks different for each individual who lives with it.

6. I don't have a service dog because I have "brittle" or "bad" diabetes. I have Dixie because:
1) I love dogs,
2) I was having problems knowing when my blood sugar was low or dropping,
3) I wanted a security system and didn't want another site needed for a CGMS (continuous glucose monitoring system),
4) I like to be on the cutting edge and try things that others don't always believe can work, and
5) because it makes living with diabetes a LOT easier for me.

Read Full Article

Subcategories

Find out if you qualify for discount Diabetic testing supplies, free offers or other running discounts at this time.


  1. First Name*
    Enter first name
  2. Last Name*
    Enter last name
  3. Phone*
    Enter valid US phone number
  4. E-mail*
    Enter email address



By submitting this form I authorize to be contacted by telephone. Please be assured that we value and protect your privacy. Co-Pays and Deductibles may apply.

About The Diabetes Network

The Diabetes Network was developed with the idea that people living with diabetes needed a central place to go for resources as well as get ideas, suggestions and encouragement. We have put a lot of effort into this website to make it easy and fun to navigate as well as informative so that you can have a voice when it comes to managing your diabetes. Please let us know how we can improve this website to better suit your needs.

More about our Mission

We're on a mission to make the healthcare community more technologically advanced than ever before. This website adapts to fit your tablet, iPad®, iPhone®, Android® or other smartphone. Just one of the ways we are working to make life easier for those living with Diabetes. Learn More...