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bookDiabetes articles about daily topics that affect those living with diabetes. There is a lot of information about diabetes and hopefully you find this information useful in your everyday life. Here we have compiled a list of older articles from our previous "The Diabetes Network" along with links to blogs and articles, an extended reading archive. You can use the search in the top-right menu to search for specific articles.

 

Phase 2 Mittens

Shucks, winter is here. We are getting some heavy snow right now - that's Minnesota for you.

I am thankful that I have a big supply of warm clothes and accessories. Inluding my walk to the bus stop and then the wait, I can be out in the elements anywhere from 10-30 minutes. It's best to be prepared.

These are my Phase 1 gloves, from the Dollar Store. I always lose them so will buy 4 pairs at a time. Phase 1 weather is between 20-40 degrees.

Then we come to Phase 2, about 0-20 degrees. These are mittens I knit and the pattern called them "Traditional Latvian Mittens", but we all know that things change over time and continents. There is another wool mitten inside, but, they are really not as warm as they look.

And finally, when it's below zero, we have to call on the big guys. The Phase 3's are lined with goosedown. I ordered them from Canada 10 years ago and guard them with my life. See that big diagonal ridge? That's where the down has lumped up, but if I put them in the dryer on low, the lump will disappear.

Today was a Phase 2 day. As I was getting ready to get off the bus, the woman next to me said, "oh, are those the mittens with that insulin from 3M"? Obviously she meant
Thinsulate, a synthetic product made to add warmth to outdoor clothing. I told her no, they weren't, but I had some insulin in my purse. She replied, "well, that's good - you can't go wrong with a nice warm handbag".

No, I guess you can't.

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BIG BLUE, PART 2

I'm well aware that I have never been without any medical supplies.
Growing up my dad had amazing health insurance coverage and we had closets (yes, plural) filled with supplies.
Now grown up and on my own insurance,
I am again, blessed with everything I need.

* All it took was a phone call from my doctor to get set up with sensors and my continuous glucose monitor.
* My pump just ran out of warranty in August.
* One phone call and I was upgraded to the newest model.
* I even got to choose the color I wanted (pink!), and it was sent to my work just days later.
* My insurance was so good in fact, that after turning in my old pump, I had a credit of money on my account...so essentially, I got paid to go on an upgraded pump.

Not everyone is as fortunate
and some even lack a basic needle and vial of insulin they need to keep them alive!!!

BUT...many people and various organizations have come together to make it possible for children with Diabetes in some of the poorest countries to receive the insulin they need.

And to make it happen, all you need to do is watch this video:

Up until November 14th (World Diabetes Day), money will be donated to this cause.
Read the press release here to find out more info:
Thanks for doing your part.

GO BIG BLUE!!!!   :)

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THINGS ARE LOOKING UP

"Looks like things are really looking up".
A phrase often said when things go from bad to good (or at least, better).

For me this possitive phrase had quite a different meaning the other morning.

My normal routine is to wake up at 5:45am, stumble into the kitchen to grab a protein cookie, stumble into the front room to read my Bible (while eating my protein cookie), and stumble back into the bedroom by 6:20am to wake up Derek.


(+)

I've found that the protein cookie is the ONLY thing that I can eat for breakfast that doesn't make my blood sugars spike shortly after...which then comes plumeting down an hour later. I've tried EVERYTHING...eggs, fruit, yogurt, cereal.

Derek had the day off, so I decided to let myself sleep in a little bit longer, ignoring the 5:45am alarm, and slowly rolling out of bed shortly after 6:20am.

I definitely ran at a bit of a slower pace as the intense heat was making me so lethargic. AND I spent most of the morning wiping away the sweat that was literally dripping off of my face.

I only had time to grab a granola bar on my way out to the car.
Quaker Oats.
Chocolate Chip.
17 grams of carbs.
2.1 units of insulin
...and I was off to work.


(+)

Looked down at my pump (which communicates with my CGM...continuous glucose monitor) shortly after getting to work...and things surely seemed to be looking up...





Oh come on! 246??? Double arrow up? (which means my blood sugarwas increasing quickly, by at least 40 in the last 20 minutes)



But never fear...a little bit of insulin and shortly, things were looking up...well, actually (literally) down...which was a good thing... so I was looking Up.

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To carb or not to carb?

The challenge question:

Thursday 5/13 - To carb or not to carb. Today let’s blog about what we eat. And perhaps what we don’t eat. Some believe a low carb diet is important in diabetes management, while others believe carbs are fine as long as they are counted and bolused for. Which side of the fence do you fall on? What kind of things do you eat for meals and snacks? What foods do you deem bolus-worthy? What other foodie wisdom would you like to share?

I suppose I fall in the middle. Carbohydrates are certainly something to be limited if you wish to reduce the amount of insulin you inject. I've followed the low-carb way of eating off and on and I do have a lot of energy when I am eating low carb. It's expensive, though, and I usually end up freaking out and eating carbs after a week or so. More often, I just eat what I want and bolus to cover it. Life is too short.

That being said, I do have some simple rules:

(1) I can eat what I want, as long as I record it in my food diary and make the effort to look up the carbs.

(2) If I am going to drink soda (and I have a love/hate relationship with it for various reasons), it has to be diet.

(3) Whenever possible, eat food and not foodstuff. You know the difference. If it comes in a box, sits on a shelf or contains any ingredients you can't realistically find in your kitchen, it ain't food.


The final foodie wisdom I will share with you non-existent readers (yes, I'm talking about... you!), is to read and listen to author Michael Pollan. He does an excellent job of explaining food and agricultural issues and is practical (and realistic). I've read almost all of his books and would highly recommend them.

Because of him, we (a) have belonged to a CSA - community sustained agriculture - in which we support a local farmer and her family by buying all of our needed produce and eggs (fertilized AND really cage free!) from her; (b) haven't purchased bread in over two years because we make all of it ourselves in a whopping 5 minutes or so of work per day; and (c) make such "oddities" as our own, homemade corned beef, soups, etc.

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4 Years In

  • 14,600 finger pokes
  • 910 shots of insulin

  • 426 site changes

  • 3 blood draws
  • 1 very happy, healthy little boy who I love more than life itself



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Glucomotive 2010 Ragnar Great River Relay

Yes, this relay was run in August, the 20th and 21st. Yes, it is October. That's how slow I am.

Andrew, the driver for van 1, the van I was in, had just injured his ankle on a bike ride. It was so swollen and ugly that we wondered if he could reliably work the accelerator and brakes as he drove us up the Mississippi.

Andrew's ankle later that day, as we waited for van 2 to come into the second van exchange. In the small version of this picture, it looks OK because the swelling has gone down, but if you zoom in, you can see the tiger-striping from the bruise being wrapped with an Ace bandage. But Andrew did fine driving. He kept us guessing about whether he was about to run into things, but he must have known what he was doing.
You get a good look at some of our Costco supplies in this picture, too.

Dave and Daniel relaxing at the first van exchange, I think, before Saci (below) hands off to Pratt from van 2.




Saci in Triabetes gear smiling through his first leg, which was rated "Very Hard."


Daniel, Saci, Jennifer, and Igor after a dip in the Mississippi at the second van exchange.

Daniel by our van in the early morning of the second day, at the fourth van exchange.

The runners from both vans get a rare chance to spend some time together at the fifth van exchange, waiting for Saci to come in. This is counter-clockwise from Daniel, shirtless, Gary in the "Diabetes. Run with it." shirt, Emily in her "Running on Insulin" shirt, Dave, Jennifer, Andrew, and Corinne.


Pratt hauling up a monstrous hill on his last leg.

Dave, Daniel, Igor, Anne, Saci, and Jennifer at the finish, ready for our anchor runner, Corinne, to come in.

Corinne tearing down the pavement toward the finish.

Post-race joy.

Gary, Emily, Mike, Corinne, Pratt, Anne, Igor, Jennifer, Saci, Dave, me, and Daniel.
Not pictured, the awesome drivers, Andrew and John.
Here's a great video Peter put together from stuff we shot during the race.


(Teammates, I left out last names because I wasn't sure if anyone would mind. Am I being silly?)

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