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bookDiabetes articles about daily topics that affect those living with diabetes. There is a lot of information about diabetes and hopefully you find this information useful in your everyday life. Here we have compiled a list of older articles from our previous "The Diabetes Network" along with links to blogs and articles, an extended reading archive. You can use the search in the top-right menu to search for specific articles.

 

High Blood Glucose -3 Reasons For Morning Highs

Reason # 1
During sleep, your blood sugar may decrease as a result of the amount of insulin you took that day, and the hormones, such as glucagon, that raise blood glucose may be secreted, resulting in high blood glucose in the morning. This action is called the Somogyi effect which is named after the doctor who first described it.

Some mornings, your blood glucose may be low if it didn't get low enough to trigger hormone secretion, whereas other mornings it may be high.

If you fail to understand that the main trigger is actually too much insulin and not too little, you may increase your insulin and make the situation worse.

Before increasing insulin at bedtime, do a blood glucose test in the middle of the night. If the level is low, you're in all probability experiencing the Somogyi effect, and you should decrease, NOT increase, the amount of long-acting insulin you give inject at bedtime.

Reason # 2
Another trigger of high blood glucose may be the "dawn phenomenon" which is caused by secretion of too much growth hormone during the night. By morning, it will raise your blood glucose to high levels. If your morning blood sugar levels are consistently high, nighttime long-acting insulin usually takes care of this problem and provides more normal morning blood glucose readings.

Reason # 3
Another possible reason for a morning high, not related to either of the previously mentioned circumstances, is that the insulin used at bedtime did not work long enough to keep the blood glucose from rising overnight. Older forms of insulin such as NPH tend to fall short in this manner, whereas newer long-acting insulin like Glargine and Detemir don't.

Conclusion:
High blood glucose levels in the morning must be avoided if you want to diminish detrimental effects and improve overall glucose control. Consider the 3 reasons given here to determine which of them may be giving you a problem, then take corrective action based on your findings.

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An original video - why everyone should be on the insulin pump

6 month review of insulin pump, click HERE

Medtronic Revel insulin pump review, click HERE

P90x & the pump, click HERE

Complaining never helps, click HERE

A visual aid (graph) to prove the point, click HERE

What I regret about choosing the pump, click HERE

My family explains the benefits of the pump (a video), click HERE

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Things That Make Me Go Hmmmmm

I have a headache and can't imagine posting anything too insightful, so instead here are the things running through my diabetic brain right now:

1) How did I manage to keep such awesome BG numbers Thanksgiving Day and the following days, while still enjoying in my favorite homemade pumpkin cheesecake, pecan pie, pumpkin pie, and chocolate caramels (yes, I indulged in all of the above)?

2) How come after getting back to work and my normal routine, including a good and sweaty spin session this morning, now my BG numbers are so high? I hope I am not getting sick.

3) Why have I been hungry all day, even after eating half a bag of almonds during the day and big fettuccine alfredo meal? Normally, it would be because of my workout this morning and my muscles storing up all the glucose they can, but then I would expect lower BGs, which as #2 indicates is not the case.

4) Why did pricking my fingers hurt soooo bad last week? No matter which finger I tried? Thankfully, that has come and gone.

5) Why does the nursing room at work always have to be in use when I want to check my BG and/or take some insulin? I guess some people actually need to use it for it was intended.

6) When will taking insulin in a public restroom ever become normal and not gross to me?

7) How come sometimes when I poke myself I bruise or bleed or it just really hurts, while other times I feel nothing?

8) Maybe having a pump would help solve many of my questions/issues? But then which pump, how much would it cost, how difficult would changing infusion sites be, how would I hide it under my clothes, etc???

Well on that note, I think it's time to schedule another appointment with my CDE!

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Diabetes Transplant Summit experience - Part 1

I'm still just glowing from my experiences yesterday here in Bethesda.  It was a day full of new and exciting opportunities.  Beyond that, it felt like I was an important part of a group of people with a common desire to show the world how islet cell transplantation can change lives.

The day began at 7am.  Andi Stancik, the executive director of the Diabetes Research and Wellness Foundation picked up Dr. Hering and me at our hotel and transported us to her office which is in the same building as the Fox TV station.  We arrived early and were able to use the time planning what to say and just getting to know each other.  It was very special for me to be able to spend time with Dr. Hering.  Besides being dynamic, he is so personable that I was able to feel comfortable with him.  What an opportunity to be involved with a project such as this with someone that I admire so much.  Its an extraordinary experience that I enjoyed in the moment and will enjoy thinking back on.

During this time, I was also introduced to Dr. Walter Bortz.  Dr. Bortz has written several books and led a very interesting life.  He recently ran the Boston Marathon at age 80.  He was the moderator of the Transplant Summit and kept us all under control and entertained.

The TV interview went well.  Here is the link to our segment on  Fox at 5.   I was pretty nervous, but managed to get through it.  We were provided with possible questions which helped a lot.  Dr. Hering talked about the science of islet cell transplants and I told of my experience.  I have never been in a television studio before and that was interesting.  Its not what it looks like on TV.  The cameras make things look like the various sections are all linked together.  Actually they are separate islands.  The lighting was interesting too.  It really held things together.  The newscasters were very friendly and accommodating and I felt as much at ease as possible.  I watched them again this morning and they seemed somehow different and more professionally distant than they were in person.

 

When we returned to the hotel, Dr. Hering invited me to join him for breakfast.  I, of course, brought up the pig islet cells and he sounded very pleased with how the study was progressing.  He said that two transplants would be occurring today (in monkeys, not humans yet).  He is hoping to get enough transplants performed to get FDA approval to try with humans possibly sometime next year.

I have to temporarily end here and get to the airport.  I hope to get some pictures and a detailed description of the Transplant Summit soon.  We are heading to Tampa this evening with some friends.  I can't wait to see the palm trees and smell some salt air.  What a week!

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Practice, Practice.....

I expected the "I'm free".....I didn't expect the second line. It made me realize how different he must feel all the time. So....I'll have to add another positive to MDI!!:)

This morning I began teaching the rest of the family how to take care of J.J. on MDI. When J.J. was first diagnosed they were all really too shocked and scared to want to learn. We didn't push them, but hoped they would step up. Eventually they did.....to a point of wondering if it was too much!:) Today they jumped in.....no fears(o.k. a few!)......but they have much more confidence now that they could give a shot without really, really messing up.


I had them practice using an old Lantus vial, used syringes and a clementine. Granted they can't pinch the skin of a clementine, but I had them simulate the effect. I also wanted to make sure they understood what calibration was on the syringe. I would throw out a dosage amount and ask them to draw it up for me. Thankfully I did that, because both of the girls thought the first line was "one" not "zero". So they would have been a unit off!!


J.J. even wanted to give it a try. I drew up the dose and let him inject it. Right now he's a little clumsy, being he's only 7 and his dexterity isn't quite what it will be in a few years......but I think he could do it. I don't think I'd let him draw up the insulin yet, but we shall see! For now he's where he should be.......out in the dirt pit......FREE...to be....a REAL BOY!!!!:)

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Glaxo, Tolerx diabetes drug fails in study

NEW YORK - Tolerx Inc. and GlaxoSmithKline PLC said Friday their potential diabetes drug failed to meet its goal in a late-stage study.

The companies are studying otelixizumab as a potential treatment for patients with Type 1 diabetes. In Type 1 diabetes, the autoimmune system destroys insulin producing cells, making it necessary for patients to receive insulin boosts. The condition is fatal if not treated with insulin.

Type 2 diabetes is more common and involves the body not being able to properly use the insulin it produces.

The companies have suspended a similar late-stage study on the drug, pending review of the failed study.

"While we are disappointed in the DEFEND-1 (study) results of otelixizumab, we remain committed to the development and commercialization of the candidates in our pipeline, each of which has a distinct mechanism and target for correcting abnormal immune responses," said Douglas J. Ringler, president and CEO of Tolerx, in a statement.

Tolerx is a privatel held biotechnology company based in Cambridge, Mass.

Sources include
http://www.tolerrx.com/index.php
http://www.tolerrx.com/index.php?page=trx4

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