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bookDiabetes articles about daily topics that affect those living with diabetes. There is a lot of information about diabetes and hopefully you find this information useful in your everyday life. Here we have compiled a list of older articles from our previous "The Diabetes Network" along with links to blogs and articles, an extended reading archive. You can use the search in the top-right menu to search for specific articles.

 

Part 2: CureDM: Human Islet Peptide: An Innovative Therapy for Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

Endogenous insulin deficiency is the tie that binds all forms of diabetes. – Pittinger, Taylor-Fishwick, Vinik - A role for islet neogenesis in curing diabetes.

 

Many of us think of diabetes as a lack of insulin due to the destruction of the beta cells, but more recent research has shown that the problem is more complicated. Islet cells contain 5 cells that work together. As a matter of fact, in humans beta cells are constantly in contact with alpha cells, epsilon cells, delta cells and somotostatin cells.  Each plays a role in producing hormones necessary for normal glucose levels.  Ever wonder why if you eat the same food, do the same activity, and glucose can vary by 100s of points?  It's likely due to abnormalities in the cells within the islets other than beta cells. With autoimmune attack on the beta cells in type 1 diabetes and chronic destruction of betas in type 2 diabetes, the hormonal balance created from all the cells is thrown off.

 

Roughly 20 years ago, researchers discovered that beta cells expand and contract based on the individual's needs.  When diabetes occurs, the beta cells can't replicate enough to keep glucose levels normal.  Another interesting fact, beta cells will generate more beta cells due to dietary habits to meet the needs of a person, but beyond a certain point of exhaustion is where type 2 Diabetes is diagnosed.

 

Like watching the race to the moon 50 years ago, science seems to be pushing the envelope on stem cell research. The intensity around stem cells has been a fast pace and highly competitive field yielding some new understanding in the biology of many chronic conditions and among the top players is diabetes.  Stem cell research has many fronts, embryonic stem cell has vast capabilities, but the research has been slowed by the moral debate. Other areas have been donor stem cell transplants, which have proved successful in regenerating islets, but did not yield enough insulin to reverse diabetes. Another area that has gotten less coverage is a therapy that holds more promise of adult stem cells that are present in the adult pancreas that can be turned on in times of acute injury.  New islets are turned in response to pancreatic injury such as during acute pancreatitis, pancreatic stones, and data suggests that even at the onset of type 1 diabetes, the pancreas tries to turn on new islets, but the rate of islet neogenesis can't keep pace with the autoimmune destruction.  This is where CureDM is vested.

 

Islet Neogenesis is based on using the body’s own progenitor cells that reside in the pancreas to turn into insulin producing beta cells. Using genomics (study of genes) and proteomic (study of proteins), CureDM figured out how to successfully change progenitor cells into Islet cells which are fully equipped with all 5 cells, alpha, beta, delta, epsilon and PP cells. The key to success comes from Human Islet Peptide, HIP.

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To friends & family members of those newly diagnosed...

Hi, and welcome!

Type-1 diabetes can be a very scary diagnosis. There are a million unanswered questions and even more unfounded fears. For parents there is anxiety, doubt, blame, terror, and a myriad of other emotions running wild through your hearts and minds.

Let me be the first to tell you:

It's going to be all right!

This blog was created as a resource for you. I want you to learn as I learn, and more importantly I hope you learn from my mistakes. It's easy to look back over the course of time and concede that what seemed like a sound decision in the past was in fact an erroneous one. A major mistake I made with my diabetes was dismissing the pump.

I simply refused to allow myself to even consider the possibility of being on the insulin pump. You can look back to my first few posts to read why, but I can tell you that I was foolish and wrong for thinking so negatively.

The insulin pump is more than 'an alternative' to taking shots. I would say that comparing the pump to shots is like comparing type-1 to type-2 diabetes. Sure, in some ways they're alike; but in many more ways they are totally different.

Knowing how I feel now, compared to how I felt then (for over 20 years)....knowing that it would affect not only how I am, but who I am.....knowing that this one simple piece of equipment can prolong my life and improve my quality of life exponentially.....knowing the freedom it affords.....knowing that I am more now of who I was meant to be....knowing all that, and so much more I can confidently say:

Please do everything you can to convince, persuade, or encourage every single person with diabetes you EVER meet to get on the insulin pump IMMEDIATELY.

It's never too late, or too early to start.

Until next time, keep pumpin'...

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School and Diabetes and 3 Day Weekends and Other Family Stuff

I love 3 day weekends! School tomorrow...I have mixed feelings on this. Allow me to explain...of course I will miss the little nippers on my Mondays off, but it'll be nice to have the house to myself. It's a drag that I have to go to the school to check Aaron's blood sugar and give him his insulin, but we still would rather do this than to trust someone at the school with this task. Aaron and Emily will have different lunch periods, would have been nice to have them at the same time. We got good news the other day, Emily has the same teacher that Aaron had for 1st grade, whom we loved! It's so nice when your kids get a teacher that you like.

Matt seems to have settled in at Ferris, and Jessie is taking classes at Macomb Community College. She still has no idea what she wants to do with her life, but that's O.K., at least she is preparing for the future.

Oh, did I mention that I love 3 day weekends?

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What I regret about choosing the insulin pump over taking shots or any other diabetes management technique

6 month review of insulin pump, click HERE

Medtronic Revel insulin pump review, click HERE

P90x & the pump, click HERE

Complaining never helps, click HERE

A visual aid (graph) to prove the point, click HERE

What I regret about choosing the pump, click HERE

My family explains the benefits of the pump (a video), click HERE

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The Unsung Heroes of Diabetes Care (a.k.a. give your CDE / nurse practitioner a hug today)

6 month review of insulin pump, click HERE

Medtronic Revel insulin pump review, click HERE

P90x & the pump, click HERE

Complaining never helps, click HERE

A visual aid (graph) to prove the point, click HERE

What I regret about choosing the pump, click HERE

My family explains the benefits of the pump (a video), click HERE

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Insulin resistance linked to Alzheimer's brain plaques

by CTV.ca News Staff

Updated: Thu. Aug. 26 2010

A new study has more bad news for people with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes: researchers have found evidence they may be at increased risk for developing the brain plaques linked to Alzheimer's disease.

In the new study, which appears in the journal Neurology, 135 Japanese men and women underwent diabetes screening tests in 1988. They were then followed for up to 15 years for signs of Alzheimer's disease.

After they died, researchers conducted autopsies on their brains to look for plaques, and brain "tangles," another brain abnormality seen with Alzheimer's disease. While 16 per cent had symptoms of Alzheimer's disease while alive, a total of 65 per cent had brain plaques. Plaques were found in 72 per cent of people with insulin resistance and 62 per cent of those with no indication of insulin resistance, the researchers wrote.

People who had abnormal results on their blood sugar tests were more likely to have plaques in their brain, the study shows. This relationship was more pronounced among people who also had a form of the ApoE gene that's been linked to a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

There was no link between insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes and risk for developing brain tangles, the study found. The researchers say it's not clear if insulin resistance is a cause of brain plaques. But if it is, that leaves the door open to perhaps preventing Alzheimer's disease by controlling or preventing diabetes. The study's findings are significant, the authors say, given the rising prevalence of both type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

"With the rising obesity rates and the fact that obesity is related to the rise in type 2 diabetes, these results are very concerning," study author Dr. Kensuke Sasaki, with Kyushu University in Fukuoka, Japan, said in a news release.

As for why diabetes and Alzheimer's might be linked, the researchers suggest that having high levels of glucose and insulin in the blood may damage neurons.

It may also hinder the brain's ability to clear out amyloids, a protein normally produced by the body. These proteins can then form the beta-amyloid plaques that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease.

Sources include
http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/print/CTVNews/20100826/diabetes-alzheimers-100826/20100826/?hub=Health&subhub=PrintStory
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100315161921.htm
http://www.neurology.org/
http://www.nia.nih.gov/Alzheimers/Publications/adfact.htm
http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/APOE
http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/insulinresistance
http://hyoka.ofc.kyushu-u.ac.jp/search/details/K002449/e

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