Diabetes Articles
  • Sign Up
FacebookTwitterDiggStumbleuponGoogle BookmarksRedditLinkedinPinterest

bookDiabetes articles about daily topics that affect those living with diabetes. There is a lot of information about diabetes and hopefully you find this information useful in your everyday life. Here we have compiled a list of older articles from our previous "The Diabetes Network" along with links to blogs and articles, an extended reading archive. You can use the search in the top-right menu to search for specific articles.

 

What your parents said

Last week I was invited to be a speaker at a local camp for families with diabetes.
There were four groups of children(as well as their parents), divided by ages . In preparing, I created a sheet that asked a series of questions.
Namely,
1. The easiest thing about dealing with diabetes is..
2. The hardest thing, etc....
3. The best thing, etc.....
4. The worst thing, etc.....
5. I wish my child knew....

The parents had the above questions, and the kids' sheets had the same questions, but the 'tense' was altered. For example, Q.1 read, "the easiest thing about having diabetes is..." and the last question was, "I wish my parents knew..."

Being that the responses were anonymous, I had hoped for honesty. What I got was beyond what I had hoped for. Here's a sampling of the parental responses...

The best thing about dealing with diabetes is...
-"There is treatment for the disease my son has."
-"Seeing the courage my daughter has.."
-"you can still do the same things that everyone else does"
And more than one parent said plainly,
-"nothing"

The worst thing about dealing with diabetes is...
-"dealing with potential restrictions on future activities."
-"missing activities with other children."
-"having it for the rest of your life??"
-"not knowing the future."
-"feeling like I am always bugging him about his sugar (level) or treating."

Now, let me address some of these answers: diabetes should not restrict or hinder you from anything. That's outdated info. Kids with diabetes do not need to miss anything. Further, we are on the cusp of the cure. As I said at camp, THERE HAS NEVER BEEN A BETTER TIME TO HAVE DIABETES!!

Not knowing the future can cause anxiety in anyone (with diabetes or not), but faith and a secure foundation can really counteract your fears.

And finally, "I wish my child knew..."

-"I would trade places with him if I could.."
-"How smart he is.."
-"how proud of her I am."
-"highs and lows will still happen even if you do everything 'by the book'"
-"there's nothing she can't do"
-"by not testing and taking care of himself how he is hurting his body."

These answers reveal much of what all parents feel for their kids. How many of us would do anything to take away our child's hurts, fears, or struggles?
Now compound that with a chronic disease that takes no prisoners, and the helpless feelings must multiply.

Yet there is another side to these answers that shows how diabetes affects more than just the diabetic. It affects the whole family, and includes friends, classmates, and more. Education is real power when it comes to effectively managing diabetes. There's no reason a child today should feel limited or inhibited in any way by diabetes.

All of this reinforces the conclusion I had previously reached, which is everyone with diabetes should be on the insulin pump.

It allows freedom and flexibility; but most importantly it is the best tool we have today to treat diabetes.

Stay tuned, because the next post will highlight what all the children with diabetes had to say, and you are NOT going to want to miss it!!

Until there's a cure, there's the pump.

That's why iPump.

Read Full Article

Why this but not that?

I work as a CPA, but do not prepare federal income tax returns as part of my work. Never have; I just don't want to specialize in that. Around this time of year, as April 15th approaches, lots of well meaning friends express concern about "how busy you must be this time of year". This is in spite of me having told many of them previously that I don't do taxes. I do not find this to be upsetting at all, and have plenty of patience and grace to extend to those friends, as I'm sure they extend to me on other things.

Contrast that with how I feel when those same well meaning friends make comments about my diabetes. You know what I'm talking about....things like "oh, I forgot, you can't eat that, can you?", or "you need to eat your lunch right on time, don't you?" That in spite of me having told them previously that Type 1 diabetes is not so much about what I cannot eat or when I eat (thanks to my pump), but about matching insulin with what I do eat and my activity level. Why do those questions still cause a flood of emotions, and leave me often reliving the comment long after it is made? I do my best to extend grace to those friends, and in my head realize it's unrealistic to expect them to remember much about my diabetes. But it's a battle to fight through those initial emotions to get there sometimes.

Both are sterotypes of sorts, but one leaves me feeling judged, and the other does not. How about you, have you found a dichotomy in how you respond to D related comments vs. comments about other aspects of your life?

Read Full Article

Health care plan woes.

My husband's employer brought the hammer down and informed us that they are dropping Tufts Health Care...which of course is the insurance we have. It's also the insurance we love. The coverage has been great- we've never had to pay for an insulin pump, our copays are low, and I actually like talking to the helpful staff at member services (God knows they've heard from me enough over the years).
Now comes the daunting task of reviewing insurance plans. I have 3 choices- all plans offered by Blue Cross, Blue Shield.

A side note: Our dissatisfaction with BCBS is the reason we switched to Tufts in the first place. BCBS sent an outrageous bill totaling upwards of $10,000 to us after the birth of Noah, claiming we had to pay out of pocket for a c-section and 4 day hospital stay. The reason? They had no physical proof of my admittance to the hospital. Seriously? Hey, this baby here isn't physical proof enough for ya? True story.

Ok, so needless to say, my expectations that any of our options is going to offer us a vast improvement over what we currently have are lacking. There's also this scary feeling that I'll miss something, and be stuck with a plan that could possibly hurt Noah health-wise. I've heard so many stories of people with type 1 diabetes fighting with their insurance companies over coverage. What's going to happen when Noah's doctor wants to try a CGM and insurance says "no"? I wouldn't back down from a "no", but I'd rather not have to fight over it in the first place.
I understand and appreciate that we are VERY lucky to have any coverage at all. I want the best possible everything for him, and honestly, I don't want to screw this up.

Read Full Article

4 Years In

  • 14,600 finger pokes
  • 910 shots of insulin

  • 426 site changes

  • 3 blood draws
  • 1 very happy, healthy little boy who I love more than life itself



Read Full Article

Endo Appt #....(Oh who's counting anymore?)

Monday we set out early for J.J.'s 3 month endo visit. We debated even going, considering the snow storm and the amount of time it would take us. Normally a 1:15 minute drive took us 3 hours. We were an hour late!!! We called en route to let them know we were coming, hoping they would still see us. Our endo (I LOVE HER!!) said she would see us no problem!

The office was like a ghost town. Normally a very active clinic now had the lights dimmed, and very few people milling about. Turns out JJ was her only patient that morning. The nurse said they had a ton of cancellations. Well, good for us!! That means first class treatment!! As if we don't receive it normally.:)

The appointment was very routine. Great news is that his A1C is down from 8.2 to 7.7!! Awesome for us to see it come down on the pump. We were beginning to wonder. She helped us try to figure out our trouble spots!! Nights as usual are still bad and recently when he goes out to play in the snow he goes low. It's amazing what a little activity can do the the BG's!

Real Estate Issues

One new development was a lump on the bum!!! She found one on the upper quadrant of his left cheek. She showed me how to recognize it and had me feel for it. She asked if he wasn't feeling his site changes as much or would he direct me toward that spot for the site change? Sure enough....his site changes were becoming a breeze. What has happened is that he's kind of formed a "callous" of sorts. We've used that particular area so much that the insulin can't absorb as well and it's formed a "lump". He doesn't feel the site changes as much there, so he's always telling me to "go higher". She said the lump should go away, but we can't use a pretty large area of his small bum......we're losing good real estate!!!! Hopefully it will dissipate quick so we can rotate that site back in.

Since we had extra time with our endo we got in a discussion about "prevention" of diabetes. I had recently read an article in the "Diabetes Forecast" that said if a woman ate veggies every day of her pregnancy her child was half as likely to get diabetes. But those that only ate veggies 3 times a week had a 50% increase in risk. I was skeptical of the findings. But also there's a big push for Vitamin D supplements especially in Northern climates.....what's up with that? Well, she had some interesting information to share.

First the veggies thing. She said studies like that are so hard to pinpoint any one thing unless you begin to look at a lot of other factors. Since the "research" only studied veggies and nothing else, it really can't conclude a whole lot. She said about ten years ago she studied all the available studies out at the time and none of them could pinpoint any one factor for prevention.....like say we know that folic acid is important for pregnant women.

"....it is good for the eyes to see the sun!"(Ecc. 11:7)

However, she said one thing they have determined is that the closer people live to the equator the less people are diaganosed with type 1. And that they've tracked people groups that normally reside near the equator having a lower rate of diagnosis, but once that people group is moved closer to a polar region their rates increase. Thus all the research into Vitamin D....a vitamin we get most from the sun!! Their clinic now is recommending all kids get supplemented or make sure they take in 4 glasses of milk a day. She didn't say that taking Vit D would "prevent" type 1 (they just haven't proven that yet!), but most kids are deficient in it, especially us Minn-e-soh-tans!!!!

So......my thought......considering the LONNGGGG drive in a snow storm.....is that a move to a tropical location is in order!!! Equator here we come!!!!!:)

Read Full Article

HOPE is in the CURE

March 9, 2009, Washington, DC -- The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, a leader in setting the agenda for diabetes research worldwide and the largest charitable funder and advocate of type 1 diabetes research, praised President Barack Obama for the Executive Order officially repealing the existing policy limiting federal research funding for embryonic stem cell research to cell lines established prior to August 9, 2001.

"We're very grateful to President Obama for setting in place a policy to fully explore this promising field of science," said new JDRF President and CEO, Dr. Alan Lewis. "President Obama's Executive Order is a strong signal to patients, scientists, and the nation that we have his full support to pursue science that may accelerate progress to new treatments and possible cures for diabetes."

Type 1 diabetes affects as many as 3 million people in the U.S., causing the immune system to attack insulin-producing cells in the pancreas so that the body no longer uses sugar to create energy. There is no cure for type 1 diabetes. Research into human embryonic stem cells could speed the development of a cure for diabetes by helping researchers better understand how the disease occurs and eventually derive insulin-producing cells that are safe to use for transplantation. These discoveries are years away, but federal guidance and funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will help speed scientific progress.

"This is an exciting day for children and adults living with type 1 diabetes, their families, and everyone with a connection to diabetes who have worked for years to remove restrictions to this research," said Dr. Lewis. "Now researchers, physicians, and ethicists at NIH can make decisions on ethical research based purely on sound science."

Read Full Article

Subcategories

Find out if you qualify for discount Diabetic testing supplies, free offers or other running discounts at this time.


  1. First Name*
    Enter first name
  2. Last Name*
    Enter last name
  3. Phone*
    Enter valid US phone number
  4. E-mail*
    Enter email address



By submitting this form I authorize to be contacted by telephone. Please be assured that we value and protect your privacy. Co-Pays and Deductibles may apply.

About The Diabetes Network

The Diabetes Network was developed with the idea that people living with diabetes needed a central place to go for resources as well as get ideas, suggestions and encouragement. We have put a lot of effort into this website to make it easy and fun to navigate as well as informative so that you can have a voice when it comes to managing your diabetes. Please let us know how we can improve this website to better suit your needs.

More about our Mission

We're on a mission to make the healthcare community more technologically advanced than ever before. This website adapts to fit your tablet, iPad®, iPhone®, Android® or other smartphone. Just one of the ways we are working to make life easier for those living with Diabetes. Learn More...