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bookDiabetes articles about daily topics that affect those living with diabetes. There is a lot of information about diabetes and hopefully you find this information useful in your everyday life. Here we have compiled a list of older articles from our previous "The Diabetes Network" along with links to blogs and articles, an extended reading archive. You can use the search in the top-right menu to search for specific articles.

 

THE BOYS ARE BACK IN TOWN

It's that time of year again.
The beginning of the end. It came so quickly.
Somehow the Summer flew by again.
I didn't even go to the beach, didn't make it to any farmer's markets. I don't have a tan...
but I'm ok.
The leaves will soon change. The cool breeze will blow while I wear comfy sweaters and eat chili.
And...fall will be in full swing.

Training camp always marks the end of summer and the beginning of Derek's favorite season...FOOTBALL!

We made our annual trek to BEARbonnais last week to watch the guys practice.


After the hour or so drive, we were ready for all things blue and orange.



Maybe a little TOO much blue and orange!!!



The Hills joined us again this summer (while Jenny was at work).



They know this is serious business, so they were ready to take pictures, get autographs, and cheer on the Bears with us!





We watched them run plays.



And do drills.
(These guys are HUGE! I wouldn't want to get in their way!).



Some of the guys stuck around after practice to sign autographs.



And some even took pictures with us.




It was another great day at ONU


Dave, class of 1996,     Jake, class of  2024,    Abby, class of 2026

It was a busy, but fun day.



Have I mentioned before on this blog that I really like Jay Cutler???



We didn't get his autograph this time, so I now carry a silver sharpie with me everywhere...just in case I happen to bump into him.
I'd have him sign my insulin pump!
You think I'm kidding...but check my purse next time you're with me.
It's true.
...and now you think I'm crazy!


If I did see him, I'd give him a big hug (after he signed my pump of course)
 and I'd thank him for all that he's doing for kids with Diabetes.

Then I'd pat him on the butt and say..."Now come on Jay! Let's go get some touchdowns!"

...and so another season begins!

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What your parents said

Last week I was invited to be a speaker at a local camp for families with diabetes.
There were four groups of children(as well as their parents), divided by ages . In preparing, I created a sheet that asked a series of questions.
Namely,
1. The easiest thing about dealing with diabetes is..
2. The hardest thing, etc....
3. The best thing, etc.....
4. The worst thing, etc.....
5. I wish my child knew....

The parents had the above questions, and the kids' sheets had the same questions, but the 'tense' was altered. For example, Q.1 read, "the easiest thing about having diabetes is..." and the last question was, "I wish my parents knew..."

Being that the responses were anonymous, I had hoped for honesty. What I got was beyond what I had hoped for. Here's a sampling of the parental responses...

The best thing about dealing with diabetes is...
-"There is treatment for the disease my son has."
-"Seeing the courage my daughter has.."
-"you can still do the same things that everyone else does"
And more than one parent said plainly,
-"nothing"

The worst thing about dealing with diabetes is...
-"dealing with potential restrictions on future activities."
-"missing activities with other children."
-"having it for the rest of your life??"
-"not knowing the future."
-"feeling like I am always bugging him about his sugar (level) or treating."

Now, let me address some of these answers: diabetes should not restrict or hinder you from anything. That's outdated info. Kids with diabetes do not need to miss anything. Further, we are on the cusp of the cure. As I said at camp, THERE HAS NEVER BEEN A BETTER TIME TO HAVE DIABETES!!

Not knowing the future can cause anxiety in anyone (with diabetes or not), but faith and a secure foundation can really counteract your fears.

And finally, "I wish my child knew..."

-"I would trade places with him if I could.."
-"How smart he is.."
-"how proud of her I am."
-"highs and lows will still happen even if you do everything 'by the book'"
-"there's nothing she can't do"
-"by not testing and taking care of himself how he is hurting his body."

These answers reveal much of what all parents feel for their kids. How many of us would do anything to take away our child's hurts, fears, or struggles?
Now compound that with a chronic disease that takes no prisoners, and the helpless feelings must multiply.

Yet there is another side to these answers that shows how diabetes affects more than just the diabetic. It affects the whole family, and includes friends, classmates, and more. Education is real power when it comes to effectively managing diabetes. There's no reason a child today should feel limited or inhibited in any way by diabetes.

All of this reinforces the conclusion I had previously reached, which is everyone with diabetes should be on the insulin pump.

It allows freedom and flexibility; but most importantly it is the best tool we have today to treat diabetes.

Stay tuned, because the next post will highlight what all the children with diabetes had to say, and you are NOT going to want to miss it!!

Until there's a cure, there's the pump.

That's why iPump.

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Show-and-tell...

I have rectified the aforementioned problem by introducing my pump to the entire office at this morning's all-staff meeting. I just said that I know people have had questions and, so, rather than repeat myself to each concern (which was getting quite stressful) I thought it best to just present it to the group.

I introduced several issues I knew to be of concern: I went through how the pump works, the various types of diabetes, the misconception that people have, like: somehow people with diabetes cause their own illness and that treatment starts with diet, then if it's really bad you go on needles and then if it's really really bad you end up on a pump. I relayed that the truth is there are various regimes for various types of diabetes and that everyone is different. I told them that I do not manage by diet, but rather I have an insulin to carb ration that tells me for every gram of carbohydrate I eat I know I take X amount of insulin to keep my blood sugar under control. I said that managing this way meant I could eat whatever I wanted, included candy and treats.

Finally, I told people I realized that their concerns come from a good place and I wasn't blaming people, because I realize there is a big public information gap regarding diabetes.

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THINGS ARE LOOKING UP

"Looks like things are really looking up".
A phrase often said when things go from bad to good (or at least, better).

For me this possitive phrase had quite a different meaning the other morning.

My normal routine is to wake up at 5:45am, stumble into the kitchen to grab a protein cookie, stumble into the front room to read my Bible (while eating my protein cookie), and stumble back into the bedroom by 6:20am to wake up Derek.


(+)

I've found that the protein cookie is the ONLY thing that I can eat for breakfast that doesn't make my blood sugars spike shortly after...which then comes plumeting down an hour later. I've tried EVERYTHING...eggs, fruit, yogurt, cereal.

Derek had the day off, so I decided to let myself sleep in a little bit longer, ignoring the 5:45am alarm, and slowly rolling out of bed shortly after 6:20am.

I definitely ran at a bit of a slower pace as the intense heat was making me so lethargic. AND I spent most of the morning wiping away the sweat that was literally dripping off of my face.

I only had time to grab a granola bar on my way out to the car.
Quaker Oats.
Chocolate Chip.
17 grams of carbs.
2.1 units of insulin
...and I was off to work.


(+)

Looked down at my pump (which communicates with my CGM...continuous glucose monitor) shortly after getting to work...and things surely seemed to be looking up...





Oh come on! 246??? Double arrow up? (which means my blood sugarwas increasing quickly, by at least 40 in the last 20 minutes)



But never fear...a little bit of insulin and shortly, things were looking up...well, actually (literally) down...which was a good thing... so I was looking Up.

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Why this but not that?

I work as a CPA, but do not prepare federal income tax returns as part of my work. Never have; I just don't want to specialize in that. Around this time of year, as April 15th approaches, lots of well meaning friends express concern about "how busy you must be this time of year". This is in spite of me having told many of them previously that I don't do taxes. I do not find this to be upsetting at all, and have plenty of patience and grace to extend to those friends, as I'm sure they extend to me on other things.

Contrast that with how I feel when those same well meaning friends make comments about my diabetes. You know what I'm talking about....things like "oh, I forgot, you can't eat that, can you?", or "you need to eat your lunch right on time, don't you?" That in spite of me having told them previously that Type 1 diabetes is not so much about what I cannot eat or when I eat (thanks to my pump), but about matching insulin with what I do eat and my activity level. Why do those questions still cause a flood of emotions, and leave me often reliving the comment long after it is made? I do my best to extend grace to those friends, and in my head realize it's unrealistic to expect them to remember much about my diabetes. But it's a battle to fight through those initial emotions to get there sometimes.

Both are sterotypes of sorts, but one leaves me feeling judged, and the other does not. How about you, have you found a dichotomy in how you respond to D related comments vs. comments about other aspects of your life?

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Study uncovers new diabetes genes

27 June 2010 (BBC)

Twelve new genes linked with type 2 diabetes have been found in a study into the differences in people's DNA and their risk of having the condition.

A consortium including Edinburgh University scientists have identified "important clues to the biological basis of type 2 diabetes". It is hoped the findings will lead to better ways of treating the condition.

The genes tend to be involved in working cells producing insulin, which controls levels of glucose in blood. The 12 new genes brings the total number linked with type 2 diabetes to 38.

The study was led by researchers at Oxford University and forms part of the Wellcome Trust case control consortium. The group of researchers, from across the UK, Europe, USA and Canada, compared the DNA of more than 8,000 people with type 2 diabetes with almost 40,000 people without the condition. They then checked the genetic variations they found in another group including over 34,000 people with diabetes and almost 60,000 controls.

Dr. Jim Wilson, of Edinburgh University, said: "One very interesting finding is that the diabetes susceptibility genes also contain variants that increase the risk of unrelated diseases, including skin and prostate cancer, coronary heart disease and high cholesterol. "This implies that different regulation of these genes can lead to many different diseases."

Professor Mark McCarthy of Oxford University's Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism, said: "Gradually we are piecing together clues about why some people get diabetes and others don't, with the potential for developing better treatments and preventing onset of diabetes in the future. "The challenge will be to turn these genetic findings into better ways of treating and preventing the condition."

Sources include:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/scotland/edinburgh_east_and_fife/10416128.stm
http://www.scotlandsfamily.com/dna-testing.htm
http://www.ocdem.ox.ac.uk/home
http://www.ndm.ox.ac.uk/principal-investigators/researcher/mark-mccarthy
http://www.diabetes.org.uk
http://www.wtccc.org.uk

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