Diabetes Articles
  • Sign Up
FacebookTwitterDiggStumbleuponGoogle BookmarksRedditLinkedinPinterest

bookDiabetes articles about daily topics that affect those living with diabetes. There is a lot of information about diabetes and hopefully you find this information useful in your everyday life. Here we have compiled a list of older articles from our previous "The Diabetes Network" along with links to blogs and articles, an extended reading archive. You can use the search in the top-right menu to search for specific articles.


JDRF Walk to Cure Diabetes


I'm writing to you to ask for your support in a very special cause.

This year, I'll be taking part in the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation's Walk to Cure Diabetes along with a half-million other walkers across the country. Our goal: To raise $90 million to help fund research for a cure for type 1 diabetes and its complications.

Type 1, or juvenile, diabetes, is a devastating, often deadly disease that affects millions of people--a large and growing percentage of them children.

Many people think type 1 diabetes can be controlled by insulin. While insulin does keep people with type 1 diabetes alive, it is NOT a cure. Aside from the daily challenges of living with type 1 diabetes, there are many severe, often fatal, complications caused by the disease.

That's the bad news... and yes, it's pretty bad.

The good news, though, is that JDRF is making steady progress toward a cure. In fact, JDRF funding and leadership is associated with most major scientific breakthroughs in type 1 diabetes research to date. And JDRF funds more type 1 research than any other charity worldwide.

I'm writing to ask for your support because now more than ever, EACH of us can be a part of bringing about a cure. Each of us can make a real difference

Won't you please give to JDRF as generously as you're able?

Together, we can make the cure a reality.

Please visit my Walk Web page if you would like to donate online or see how close I am to reaching my personal goal:

Insulin: Shaken, Not Stirred

Thank you!


Read Full Article

Invisible Illness Week - Sept. 13-19

Via Karen at Bitter-Sweet Diabetes, I am posting this to raise awareness of Invisible Illness Week. Despite 20 years with the ups and downs of living with bigD, I don't think I've ever considered myself ill - I guess that goes to show just how invisible it is; even to me! But, I have been struggling with my feelings about living with an invisible disease and whether I can come to peace with adding someone to my team who would make type 1 diabetes much more visible, but no better understood, to the rest of the world. I'll post more about that later. In the meantime, it's Meme time:

30 Things About My Invisible Illness You May Not Know...

Read Full Article

Islet cell transplants can be cost effective as well as increase the quality of life- a study

I recently found this abstract and thought it was very interesting and exciting. I was able to get a copy of the entire article from a friend, thanks Jason, but can't print all of it due to copyright laws. I am going to attempt to write about the highlights of what this shows. A health economic analysis of clinical islet transplantation


  • cost;
  • cost-effectiveness analysis;
  • economic model;
  • health economics;
  • islet cell transplantation

Beckwith J, Nyman JA, Flanagan B, Schrover R, Schuurman H-J. A health economic analysis of clinical islet transplantation. Clin Transplant 2011 DOI: 10.1111/j.1399-0012.2011.01411.x. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

Abstract: Islet cell transplantation is in clinical development for type 1 diabetes. There are no data on the cost in relationship to its benefits. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis and made a comparison with standard insulin therapy, using Markov modeling and Monte Carlo simulations. The patient population was adults aged 20yr suffering from hypoglycemia unawareness. Data were estimates from literature and clinical trials: costs were based on the situation in the United States. For insulin therapy, cumulative cost per patient during a 20-yr follow-up was $663000, and cumulative effectiveness was 9.3 quality-adjusted life years (QALY), the average cost-effectiveness ratio being $71000 per QALY. Islet transplantation had a cumulative cost of $519000, a cumulative effectiveness of 10.9 QALY, and an average cost-effectiveness ratio of $47800. During the first 10yr, costs for transplantation were higher, but cumulative effectiveness was higher from the start onwards. In sensitivity analyses, the need for one instead of two transplants during the first year did not affect the conclusions, and islet transplantation remained cost-saving up to an initial cost of the procedure of $240000. This exploratory evaluation shows that islet cell transplantation is more effective than standard insulin treatment, and becomes cost-saving at about 9–10yr after transplantation.

This study has attempted to compare the cost of managing Type 1 diabetes by intense insulin therapy to the cost of intervention with an islet cell transplant. Also woven into the design is how both affect the quality of life.

It begins with data on islet cell graft survival. I converted their graph into a chart.

one year results: full function= 93% partial function= 8% no function= 0%

five year results: full function= 47% partial function= 37% no function= 17%

ten year results: full function= 27% partial function= 49% no function= 24%

This shows that most recipients make it to one year, and half make it to five years with no insulin.

And that half make it to ten years with at least partial function.

This is very positive. Its personally disappointing to me because I am behind the curve. I only made it 2 years with no insulin, but it gives me hope that I will remain where I am for awhile which is still at a very good place. This data reflects what I notice from the cast of characters on the islet cell recipient facebook page as well.

The Quality of life variable was very complicated and I am going to simplify it greatly. It was comparing how the hardships of each treatment affected the quality of the patient's life. The values ranged from 0 which is worst to 1 which is best. The values that I thought the most interesting were:

A healthy person aged 25-34 had a quality of life valued at 0.91

A diabetic aged 25-34 had a quality of life valued at 0.81 If this person had hypoglycemic unawareness, which all recipients do, a reduction of 0.06 put this pt at a 0.75 quality of life.

From here, adjustments were made base on diabetes causing complications that the insulin group would face, and side effects and graft failure issues that the transplant group would face. A graph shows a mostly parallel line with the transplant group slightly ahead of the insulin group.

Then came the cost analysis. The numbers themselves were stunning.

Cost of the organ procurement was $25,000.

Cost of harvesting the islets was $20,000. with a 50% success rate means $40,000.

Cost of immunosuppression was about $1400/month

Cost of transplant was $93,500. Each successive year was $19,000.

Cost of insulin therapy/year was $6,600. The cost of having complications varied from $106,000 for renal failure to $1,400 for neuropathy.

Combining these two variables shows that initially the transplant is more costly. But, over time, as the cost of the transplant stabilizes, the cost of insulin therapy and its long term complications increases. This study covered a span of 20 years. At about 9 years, the costs intersect and the islet cell transplant remains the lower cost option.

Interesting numbers here were:

20 year cost of insulin therapy was $663,000. Quality of life years gained was 9.1.

20 year cost of islet cell transplant was $519,000. Quality of life years gained was 10.9

The article goes into much more detail, but these are the highlights. It also includes a discussion about how the transplant procedure is expected to improve. This has already proven to be true in that due to a change in an enzyme used in the harvesting procedure, more islets are now obtained per pancreas than when I had my transplant in 2008. And there is much more on the horizon............

Read Full Article

Why I will never get an A in Diabetes Math

Why I will never get an A in Diabetes Math

Simplify.  Solve.  Repeat.

127bg + 20g carbs - 4 units insulin + 3 hours housework = 232bg

232bg + 40g carbs - 3 units insulin + 30 minutes sitting in car = 180bg

180bg + 10g carbs + 5 min waiting to get trail pass = 70bg

70bg + 30g carbs + 15 min cross country skiing = 42bg

42bg + 15g carbs + 60 min skiiing = 82bg

82bg + 30 g carbs + 90 min skiing = 559bg (recheck: 508bg, which is really the same number given meter accuracy)

559bg - 3.2 units insulin + 90 min waiting = 395bg

395bg - 1 unit insulin + 2 hour nap = 120bg

120bg + 10 g carbs + 2 hours loafing and feeling like crap = 187bg

187bg + 3hours sleeping = 51bg

51bg + 15 g carbs + 3 hours sleeping = 237bg

Read Full Article

What your parents said

Last week I was invited to be a speaker at a local camp for families with diabetes.
There were four groups of children(as well as their parents), divided by ages . In preparing, I created a sheet that asked a series of questions.
1. The easiest thing about dealing with diabetes is..
2. The hardest thing, etc....
3. The best thing, etc.....
4. The worst thing, etc.....
5. I wish my child knew....

The parents had the above questions, and the kids' sheets had the same questions, but the 'tense' was altered. For example, Q.1 read, "the easiest thing about having diabetes is..." and the last question was, "I wish my parents knew..."

Being that the responses were anonymous, I had hoped for honesty. What I got was beyond what I had hoped for. Here's a sampling of the parental responses...

The best thing about dealing with diabetes is...
-"There is treatment for the disease my son has."
-"Seeing the courage my daughter has.."
-"you can still do the same things that everyone else does"
And more than one parent said plainly,

The worst thing about dealing with diabetes is...
-"dealing with potential restrictions on future activities."
-"missing activities with other children."
-"having it for the rest of your life??"
-"not knowing the future."
-"feeling like I am always bugging him about his sugar (level) or treating."

Now, let me address some of these answers: diabetes should not restrict or hinder you from anything. That's outdated info. Kids with diabetes do not need to miss anything. Further, we are on the cusp of the cure. As I said at camp, THERE HAS NEVER BEEN A BETTER TIME TO HAVE DIABETES!!

Not knowing the future can cause anxiety in anyone (with diabetes or not), but faith and a secure foundation can really counteract your fears.

And finally, "I wish my child knew..."

-"I would trade places with him if I could.."
-"How smart he is.."
-"how proud of her I am."
-"highs and lows will still happen even if you do everything 'by the book'"
-"there's nothing she can't do"
-"by not testing and taking care of himself how he is hurting his body."

These answers reveal much of what all parents feel for their kids. How many of us would do anything to take away our child's hurts, fears, or struggles?
Now compound that with a chronic disease that takes no prisoners, and the helpless feelings must multiply.

Yet there is another side to these answers that shows how diabetes affects more than just the diabetic. It affects the whole family, and includes friends, classmates, and more. Education is real power when it comes to effectively managing diabetes. There's no reason a child today should feel limited or inhibited in any way by diabetes.

All of this reinforces the conclusion I had previously reached, which is everyone with diabetes should be on the insulin pump.

It allows freedom and flexibility; but most importantly it is the best tool we have today to treat diabetes.

Stay tuned, because the next post will highlight what all the children with diabetes had to say, and you are NOT going to want to miss it!!

Until there's a cure, there's the pump.

That's why iPump.

Read Full Article

HOPE is in the CURE

March 9, 2009, Washington, DC -- The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, a leader in setting the agenda for diabetes research worldwide and the largest charitable funder and advocate of type 1 diabetes research, praised President Barack Obama for the Executive Order officially repealing the existing policy limiting federal research funding for embryonic stem cell research to cell lines established prior to August 9, 2001.

"We're very grateful to President Obama for setting in place a policy to fully explore this promising field of science," said new JDRF President and CEO, Dr. Alan Lewis. "President Obama's Executive Order is a strong signal to patients, scientists, and the nation that we have his full support to pursue science that may accelerate progress to new treatments and possible cures for diabetes."

Type 1 diabetes affects as many as 3 million people in the U.S., causing the immune system to attack insulin-producing cells in the pancreas so that the body no longer uses sugar to create energy. There is no cure for type 1 diabetes. Research into human embryonic stem cells could speed the development of a cure for diabetes by helping researchers better understand how the disease occurs and eventually derive insulin-producing cells that are safe to use for transplantation. These discoveries are years away, but federal guidance and funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will help speed scientific progress.

"This is an exciting day for children and adults living with type 1 diabetes, their families, and everyone with a connection to diabetes who have worked for years to remove restrictions to this research," said Dr. Lewis. "Now researchers, physicians, and ethicists at NIH can make decisions on ethical research based purely on sound science."

Read Full Article


Find out if you qualify for discount Diabetic testing supplies, free offers or other running discounts at this time.

  1. First Name*
    Enter first name
  2. Last Name*
    Enter last name
  3. Phone*
    Enter valid US phone number
  4. E-mail*
    Enter email address

By submitting this form I authorize to be contacted by telephone. Please be assured that we value and protect your privacy. Co-Pays and Deductibles may apply.

About The Diabetes Network

The Diabetes Network was developed with the idea that people living with diabetes needed a central place to go for resources as well as get ideas, suggestions and encouragement. We have put a lot of effort into this website to make it easy and fun to navigate as well as informative so that you can have a voice when it comes to managing your diabetes. Please let us know how we can improve this website to better suit your needs.

More about our Mission

We're on a mission to make the healthcare community more technologically advanced than ever before. This website adapts to fit your tablet, iPad®, iPhone®, Android® or other smartphone. Just one of the ways we are working to make life easier for those living with Diabetes. Learn More...